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Wenn Der Himmel Dich Trägt Jennifer Lauck

Wenn Der Himmel Dich Trägt

Jennifer Lauck

Published
ISBN : 9783442309924
Hardcover
445 pages
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 About the Book 

Readers who breathed a sigh of relief at the end of Blackbird, when 12-year-old orphan Jennifer Lauck was rescued from an abusive stepmother, will have to grit their teeth all over again for the second volume of her memoirs. Jennifer is adopted byMoreReaders who breathed a sigh of relief at the end of Blackbird, when 12-year-old orphan Jennifer Lauck was rescued from an abusive stepmother, will have to grit their teeth all over again for the second volume of her memoirs. Jennifer is adopted by her fathers sister Peggy and her husband Dick Duemore: hes bullying and mean- she means well but doesnt want to hear anything negative and responds with cold anger to Jennifers unwanted confidences and insufficiently cheerful behavior. She never feels wanted in a house where she seems valued only for the chores she performs---never well enough for Mom and Dad (as the Duemores insist she call them after the adoption), who remind her constantly how grateful she should be. In prose as stark as if it had been scraped with a scalpel, Lauck recounts an adolescence scarred by lovelessness and haunted by unfinished emotional business from her parents deaths and separation from her older brother, Bryan. Shes honest about her rage and inability to trust: we see her rejecting a sweet high school boyfriend and holding Bryan at arms length during two brief reunions. Bryans suicide is a low point, but it starts the healing process- she leaves a failing marriage, and the happiness she finds with her second husband helps her come to terms with her past. No one reading this pitiless book will think Lauck has forgiven the relatives whose lies and selfishness had such disastrous consequences for her and Bryan- shes bitter and she has reason to be. I know there is a power to anger, the kind of power that helps you survive, she muses in a crucial passage that shows her moving on to acknowledge the necessity of pulling [anger] back in order to make room for the good things like love and understanding and joy. --Wendy Smith