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Apology: Color Illustrated, Formatted for E-Readers Plato

Apology: Color Illustrated, Formatted for E-Readers

Plato

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ISBN :
Kindle Edition
40 pages
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 About the Book 

How is this book unique?Formatted for E-Readers, Unabridged & Original version. You will find it much more comfortable to read on your device/app. Easy on your eyes.Includes: 15 Colored Illustrations and BiographyThe Apology (Greek: ἈπολογίαMore How is this book unique?Formatted for E-Readers, Unabridged & Original version. You will find it much more comfortable to read on your device/app. Easy on your eyes.Includes: 15 Colored Illustrations and BiographyThe Apology (Greek: Ἀπολογία Σωκράτους- Apologia Socratis) is Platos version of the speech given by Socrates as he defended himself in 399 BC against the charges of corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel. Apology here has its earlier meaning (now usually expressed by the word apologia) of speaking in defense of a cause or of ones beliefs or actions (from the Greek ἀπολογία). The general term apology, in context to literature, defends a world from attack (opposite of satire-which attacks the world). The Apology, which depicts the death of Socrates, is among the four Plato dialogues to detail the philosophers final days, along with Euthyphro, Phaedo, and Crito.The Apology begins with Socrates saying he does not know if the men of Athens (his jury) have been persuaded by his accusers. This first sentence is crucial to the theme of the entire speech. Indeed, in the Apology Socrates will suggest that philosophy begins with a sincere admission of ignorance- he later clarifies this, dramatically stating that whatever wisdom he has, comes from his knowledge that he knows nothing.Socrates imitates, parodies, and even corrects the Orators by asking the jury to judge him not by his oratorical skills, but by the truth. Socrates says he will not use ornate words and phrases that are carefully arranged, but will speak using the expressions that come into his head. He says he will use the same way of speaking that he is heard using at the agora and the money tables. In spite of his disclaimers, Socrates proves to be a master orator who is not only eloquent and persuasive, but even wise. This is how he corrects the Orators, showing what they should have been doing all along, speaking the truth persuasively with wisdom. Although it is clear that Socrates was offered the opportunity to appease the listeners with even a minimal concession to avoid the penalty, he consciously does not do so, and his speech does not allow for acquittal. Accordingly, Socrates is condemned to death.